Surah al-Qamar (The Moon ) 54 : 33

كَذَّبَتْ قَوْمُ لُوطٍۭ بِٱلنُّذُرِ

Translations

 
 Muhsin Khan
 Pickthall
 Yusuf Ali
Quran Project
The people of Lot denied the warning.

1. Lessons/Guidance/Reflections/Gems

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Explanatory Note

The story of Lot's people is given in detail elsewhere in the Qur'an. Its mention here is not intended to provide details, but rather to draw a lesson from what happens when people deny the truth and to remind them of the severe punishment that they may suffer. Hence, it starts with reporting their rejection of God's warning, followed by mentioning the punishment they suffered in consequence: "Lot's people also rejected [My] warnings."

2. Linguistic Analysis

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Frequency of Root words in this Ayat used in this Surah *


3. Surah Overview

4. Miscellaneous Information

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5. Connected/Related Ayat

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6. Frequency of the word

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7. Period of Revelation

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The incident of the ‘splitting of the moon’ (shaqq-al-Qamar) that has been mentioned in this Surah, determines its period of revelation precisely. The traditionists and commentators are agreed that this incident took place at Mina in Makkah about five years before the Prophet’s migration (Hijra) to Madīnah.

8. Reasons for Revelation

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9. Relevant Hadith

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10. Wiki Forum

Comments in this section are statements made by general users – these are not necessarily explanations of the Ayah – rather a place to share personal thoughts and stories…

11. Tafsir Zone

 

Overview (Verses 33 - 42)

Lot's People

When the curtains are raised again, we have another episode taking place close to Arabia: Lot's people also rejected [My] warnings. We sent a stone-bearing wind against them, and only Lot's family did We save at the break of dawn, as an act of grace from Us: thus do We reward the thank* He warned them of Our punishment, but they were in doubt about his warnings. They even asked him to hand his guests over to them, so We sealed their eyes. Taste, then, My punishment and [the fulfillment op My warnings.' At daybreak abiding suffering befell them. `Taste, then, My punishment and [the fulfillment of] My warnings.' We have made the Qur'an easy to bear in mind: will anyone take heed? (Verses 33-40)

The story of Lot's people is given in detail elsewhere in the Qur'an. Its mention here is not intended to provide details, but rather to draw a lesson from what happens when people deny the truth and to remind them of the severe punishment that they may suffer. Hence, it starts with reporting their rejection of God's warning, followed by mentioning the punishment they suffered in consequence: "Lot's people also rejected [My] warnings. We sent a stone-bearing wind against them, and only Lot's family did We save at the break of dawn, as an act of grace from Us: thus do We reward the thankful." (Verses 33-35) Elsewhere in the Qur'an their punishment is described in the form of "stones of clay," (51: 33) Here, the description adds that it was a wind that bears the sound of hurling stones. This description fits well with the fierce atmosphere that characterizes the whole surah. Only Lot's family, except his wife, were saved in an act of God's grace and as a reward for their faith in and gratitude to Him: "Thus do We reward the thankful" They are to be blessed even in the midst of a great calamity.

The story is thus told from both ends: the unbelievers' initial rejection of the truth and their ultimate punishment. Then the surah provides us with some further details. Again, this is one of the methods the Qur'an uses in its narratives to emphasize certain ideas.

The details given here are: "He warned them of Our punishment, but they were in doubt about his warnings. They even asked him to hand his guests over to them, so We sealed their eyes. Taste, then, My punishment and [the fulfillment oil My warnings.' At daybreak abiding suffering befell them." (Verses 36-38) Lot took much pain in warning his people against the perverted indecency they used to practice, but they doubted all his warnings, circulating their doubts among themselves. They argued with him, disputing what he said. Their reckless audacity went beyond limits, to the extent that they even tried to persuade him to hand over his angel guests. They thought them to be handsome young men, and their dirty and perverted lust was uncontrollable. They shamelessly wanted to assault his guests. They cared little for the sanctity of their prophet's home, despite his repeated warnings against their perverted practices.

At this point, God's mighty hand took action. The angels began to do what they were assigned to do: "So We sealed their eyes." The unbelievers could no longer see anything or anyone. They could not persuade Lot or catch his guests. The reference to sealing their eyes occurs so clearly only in this instance. In another surah the angels say to Lot: "We are messengers from your Lord. They shall not touch you." (11: 81) Here, what made the unbelievers unable to do what they wanted is specified as sealing their eyes.
 
As the surah tells its narrative, it suddenly shows the event as if it is happening now. The address is made to those who deserve punishment: "Taste, then, My punishment and the fulfillment of [My.] warnings." You have been warned against incurring this punishment, but you disputed those very warnings.

The sealing of their eyes took place in the evening, but it was in the morning that God determined to inflict punishment on them all: "At daybreak abiding suffering befell them." (Verse 38) This refers to the punishment already mentioned, which was the stone-bearing wind that purged the earth of their perversions.

Once more the mode of address changes so that we see the event as if it is taking place now. The punished are addressed as they suffer: "Taste, then, My punishment and [the fulfilment of] My warnings." (Verse 39) This is followed by the familiar comment mentioned after the scene of turmoil: "We have made the Qur'an easy to bear in mind: will anyone take heed?" (Verse 40)

These historical accounts are concluded with a brief reference to the fate of a famous community of unbelievers, outside Arabia: "Pharaoh's people also received warnings. They rejected all Our signs; so We took them to task as only the Almighty who is able to carry out His wig can take to task." (Verses 41-42) Thus the whole story of Pharaoh and his entourage is summed up by mentioning its beginning and end: their receiving warnings, their rejection of all the signs and miracles that the messenger sent to them showed them, and their subsequent punishment by the Almighty. The reference here to God's might and ability to carry out His will indicate that their end was violent and calamitous. It implies an allusion to the hollowness of Pharaoh's power and his ability to inflict injustice. All his might is shown to be worthless. He could avail himself of nothing. God inflicted such a punishment on him and his host that can only be carried out by the Almighty. This is most fitting because of the injustice and tyranny they practiced for so long.


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